Black suffragists after the American/National split

Title

Black suffragists after the American/National split

Description

As Lucy Stone’s American Woman Suffrage Assoc and Stanton/Anthony’s National WSA warred through the 1870’s, where were African-American women? Mostly erased, it turns out. A handful of Black women joined each, but Rosalyn Terborg-Penn said it’s hard to know if there were more since white suffragists literally wrote them out of the narrative.



So we can assume there were other Af-Am suffragists, even in those post-war years when freed people's needs were top priority. I’m going to tell a few of their stories over the days ahead. #Suffrage100

Caroline Remond Putnam was an African-American businesswoman who ran a successful wig factory & salon in Salem, Mass. In January 1870, shortly after the American/National split, AWSA organized a state affiliate in Massachusetts. At the founding meeting, Caroline Putnam was a delegate and elected to the board executive committee. While we don’t know much about her suffrage activities, R. Terborg-Penn says we can presume she stayed active until 1885, when she left the US to join her sister Sarah Remond M.D. in Italy. #BlackSuffragists #Suffrage100

Creator

Daily Suffragist

Date

14/11/2019

Files

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-2- Daily Suffragist on Twitter- -As Lucy Stone’s American Woman Suffrage Assoc and Stanton-Anthony’s National WSA warred through the 1870’s- where were African-American women- Mostly erased- it turns out- A handful of Black women joi.png
-2- Daily Suffragist on Twitter- -Caroline Remond Putnam was an African-American businesswoman who ran a successful wig factory -amp- salon in Salem- Mass- In January 1870- shortly after the American-National split- AWSA organized a state a.png

Citation

Daily Suffragist, “Black suffragists after the American/National split,” Daily Suffragist, accessed October 19, 2021, https://dailysuffragist.omeka.net/items/show/156.

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