Abolitionist patriarchy, part I

Title

Abolitionist patriarchy, part I

Description

Sexism in the abolitionist movement planted one of the seeds for Seneca Falls. In 1840 the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London refused to seat Lucretia Mott, an official US delegate. Notably, the Americans stood up for her. (1/3) #SenecaFalls #Suffrage100 #KnowYour19th https:

Lisa Tetrault describes: “the convention’s first day...devolved into a lengthy, acrimonious dispute about the rights of women to participate. Arguments ended in a ridiculous compromise: women could listen, seated behind a bar, but they could take no active part.”

Elizabeth Cady was there on her European honeymoon. Her new husband, “scruffy” abolitionist Henry Stanton wanted to watch the proceedings. She fumed w/Lucretia, 22 yrs older. The mentoring bore fruit 8 yrs later when they were back in NY where Eliz was a bored, frustrated mom. 

Creator

Daily Suffragist

Date

09/23/2019

Files

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Citation

Daily Suffragist, “Abolitionist patriarchy, part I,” Daily Suffragist, accessed October 19, 2021, https://dailysuffragist.omeka.net/items/show/57.

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