The Rollin sisters of South Carolina

Title

The Rollin sisters of South Carolina

Description

Massachusetts wasn’t a surprising place for Black women to participate in the American Woman Suffrage Assoc. - but South Carolina is less obvious.

But Black men voted in the state even before the 15th Amdt, and as a result Black women had access to some political power. Thread.

Frances, Kate, Louisa & Charlotte “Lottie” Rollin were African-American sisters pushing for women’s suffrage. Louisa spoke from the floor of the South Carolina state legislature in 1869; Frances’ husband argued for women’s votes at the SC Constitutional Convention of 1868. Lottie was a delegate to the SC chapter of AWSA: an integrated, mixed-sex group.

In 1870, she addressed them in Charleston: “We ask suffrage not as a favor, not as a privilege, but as a right based on the ground that we are human beings, and as such entitled to all human rights.”

I can’t find any image of the Rollin sisters. Instead, SC Rep. Robert Elliott advocating the Civil Rights Act of 1874. “When federal troops were withdrawn from So. Car. in 1877, Elliott was forced from office. He died in poverty on August 9, 1884 at the age of 41.” @ZinnEdProject 

Creator

Daily Suffragist

Date

16/11/2019

Relation

https://www.scencyclopedia.org/sce/entries/rollin-sisters/

Files

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-1- Daily Suffragist on Twitter- -Massachusetts wasn’t a surprising place for Black women to participate in the American Woman Suffrage Assoc- - but South Carolina is less obvious- But Black men voted in the state even before the 15th Amd.png

Citation

Daily Suffragist, “The Rollin sisters of South Carolina,” Daily Suffragist, accessed October 19, 2021, https://dailysuffragist.omeka.net/items/show/158.

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